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Saturday, 30 October 2010 09:43

I was sent a most fascinating link via our Twitter page that graphically details carbon emissions.

A footprint comparison of total carbon dioxide emissions by nation and per capita shows there’s plenty of room for smaller countries to reduce their carbon footprints. By Stanford Kay

This really is worth checking out and shows some startling results!

Friday, 22 October 2010 21:06

Rose hips have been most prolific this year here in Kent. We have watched, with great interest, the seasons roll by and the abundant flowers developing into a glut of fruit. Only now have we been able to harvest the pendulous, succulent crop from our local hedgerows. Armed on this brisk October morning with beautiful wicker gathering baskets and a most useful Swedish berry picker were we able to gather sufficient supplies.

Thursday, 21 October 2010 10:39

An interesting article about the possibilities of Stone Age technology.

“Using the techniques learned during the project, called “Immaculate Telegraphy,” an entire telegraphic network could have been constructed in the Stone Age. Motherboard producer Kelly Loudenberg joined O’Shea as he sought to bring this miraculous, insane, and wonderful technology to life.”

Monday, 18 October 2010 14:52

I recently spoke to Phil Hawkins of BushLife Essentials regarding his excellent Eco-Burner to ask how and why it worked so well. Phil had this to say: -

“The Eco Burner was inspired by an article about 3rd world country cooking inside huts. The design is also very similar to another very much smaller item that is fan assisted.  As I try my best to recycle all that I use to turn into something useful I was just stacking up a load of blasted, partly cut cylinders one day and suddenly saw the opportunity and the large Eco Burner design was born.

Thursday, 30 September 2010 12:01

I have just collected my Eco-Burner from Phil at BushLife Essentials and I must say how pleased I am with both the stove and the excellent service. I’ve spoken to Phil several times and on our last meeting at the Weald Woodfair I commissioned him to make me an Eco-Burner with removable legs and brackets for kettle, billycans, frying pans, etc.

Thursday, 23 September 2010 14:14

Whilst out walking the local fields and woodlands near my home in mid-Kent I was fortunate to find the shed skin of one the United Kingdoms six native reptiles, which are the adder or viper (Vipera berus) , grass snake (Natrix natrix), smooth snake (Coronella austriaca), sand lizard (Lacerta agilis), common lizard (Lacerta vivipara) and slow worm (Anguis fragilis).

Wednesday, 29 September 2010 15:59

We had a most wonderful day out at the Weald and Downland Open Air Museum this weekend. There is so much to see and do at there that a day never seems long enough. The buildings are just amazing and really do provide a way to step back in time and reconnect with our ancestors and certainly help me to complete the mental images I have of how our forebears used to live.

Friday, 17 September 2010 17:32

I do sometimes wonder if the trees are talking especially when I am sleeping in the woods. I find the groans and creaks very soothing and I always imagine what a tree would say if it could tell me of its life. Look at a fine old veteran tree near where you live and imagine the many changes of season and how the landscape might have looked when that ancient tree was a mere sapling!

Sunday, 12 September 2010 11:02

Having spent many occasions watching foxes (Vulpes vulpes) it never ceases to astound me how diverse their diet can be. I have often seen them hunting small mammals in the snow crusted fields, listening intently to their prey before pouncing.

Foxes like to do their toilet and deposit the faeces, or scat, on raised areas so that their scent is spread further by the wind. I’ve often found fresh scat on the large round bails the day after the bailer has been round – they are never shy to miss an opportunity.

Sunday, 05 September 2010 08:34

altAs one of the most common trees in the United Kingdom it comes as no surprise that the ash tree (Fraxinus excelsior) graces nearly all of our local woodlands here in Mid-Kent. The ash tree not only provides us with excellent wood for making craft items, tool handles, furniture, etc. but it also provides us with pendulous clusters of seeds, called keys, which we can pickle. For best results the ash keys are best harvested before they develop “stringy” fibres - so there is only a small window of opportunity to harvest them at their best, we tested ours by snapping them.

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